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1788

Daily accounts from the people that were there
Published by ozgenie1105 points  on Tue 08 of Feb., 2011
Due to "tree change" move by the author of this Blog entries have been delayed. I will catch up on these as soon as possible (once all the reference material has been unpacked)
Published by ozgenie1105 points  on Wed 26 of Jan., 2011

Signel made to wey ankor. Wind and tide being against us at am. Wee could not get out, brought too again. The Governor went to Port Jackson in the Supply brig. (James Scott Sergeant of Marines on board the Prince of Wales)

Friday 25 gott under way about 5 oClock in the morning but was obliged to bring too again as was the rest of the Ship could not get out of the Bay otherwise this would be a fine wind for use to Port Jackson we would get there in a few hours with this wind in 3 hours - I am very happy my Betsey that we are not to Stay here and So near going for if we had staid here it would have been the Grave of all of use - the Strang Sails not in Sight - this is a fine wind if they intend to come in here - Sent two corporals away on board the Charlotte According to orders of Yesterday and 4 convicts on board the Sarborough by Majr. Ross's orders who came on board after we had gott all in ? for that purpose was obliged to come to an Anchor as was all the rest of the Ships the wind blowing So hard that we cannot get out - the Comr. in the Supply gott under way again this forenoon and got out - it blows very hard and a great Sea rolling into the Bay - (Ralph Clarke, 2nd Lieutenant Royal Marines on board the Friendship)

We had barely bid each other welcome on our arrival, when an expedition up the bay was undertaken by the Governor and Lieutenant Governor, in order to explore the nature of the country, and fix on a spot to begin our operations upon. the French ships Boussele and Astrolobe dropped anchor just as we got under weigh to work out of the Bay, so that for the present nothing more but salutations could pass between us. Our passage to Port Jackson took up but few hours, and those were spent far from unpleasantly. The evening was bright, nd the prospect before us such as might justify sanguine epectation. (Captain Watkin Tench)

The Governor, with a party of Marines and some artificers selected from among the seamen of the of the Sirius and the convicts, arrived in Port Jackson, and anchored off the mouth of the cove intended for the settlement on the evening of the 25th. (David Collins -Judge-Advocate of the colony of New South Wales)

Published by ozgenie1105 points  on Mon 24 of Jan., 2011

Two ships appered of this Bay, wee did not sail for Port Jackson this day - (James Scott Sergeant of Marines on board the Prince of Wales)

On the 24th of January 1788, Governor Phillip having sufficiently explored Port Jackson, and found it in all respects highly calculated to receive such a settlement as he was appointed to establish, returned to Botany Bay. On his arrival there, the reports made to him, both of the ground which the people were clearing, and of the upper parts of the bay, which in this interval had been more particularly examined, were in the greatest degree unfavourable. It was impossible after this to hesitate concerning the choice of a situation; and orders were accordingly issued for the removal of the whole fleet to Port Jackson.
Preparations for a general removal were now made with all convenient expedition; but on the morning of the 24th of January 1788, the greatest astonishment was spread throughout the fleet by the appearance of two ships, under French colours. In this remote region visitors from Europe were very little expected, and their arrival, while the cause of it remained unknown, produced in some minds a temporary apprehension, accompanied by a multiplicity of conjectures, many of them sufficiently ridiculous. Governor Phillip was the first to recollect that two ships had been sent out some time before from France for the purpose of discovery, and rightly concluded these to be the same. But as the opposition of the wind, and a strong current prevented them at present from working into the harbour, and even drove them out of sight again to the south, he did not think proper to delay his departure for the sake of making further enquiry. (from The Voyage of Governor Phillip to Botany Bay)

Thursday 24 how I am disapointed for this morning they Said that theer were two Ships or Supposed from England - I was my beloved wife that they were from England but the Comr. Says that they are two French Ships on discoverys in the South Seas - I thought to have had a letter before now from You - this Morning the wind is against them they will not be able to come in - when will I my beloved Betsey be able to here from You I Sometimes think never - oh Terrible thought Such thoughts will Soon bring me to my Grave - Capt. Shea and Balmain dinned on board of use and Sharp came on board to Tea and Staid Supper - orders came on board for which See the orderly Book (Ralph Clarke, 2nd Lieutenant Royal Marines on board the Friendship)

Published by ozgenie1105 points  on Mon 24 of Jan., 2011

Wednessday 23 went on board the Scarborough with Arendell to Breakfast there - from that went on Shore with him and Davey to the South Shore where they intend to make the Settlement where we Saw Majr. Ross - Walk a great way in the country use three and Willm.? but did not See any of the Natives - after walking a great way Sat down to dinner with what we had brought with use when Arundell by Accident run the Kniff throu his hand - I bound it up & Stopd the Blood - I hope that the Comr. will find out a better place at Port Jackson for use to Settle for if we are oblige to Settle here at the Place they intend there will not a Soul be a life in the course of a Year - the Comr. is Returnd as the Boats are comming in - returned on board the Scarborough where we Staid Supper then Returned on board - thank God that we are to Remove to port Jackson and not Stay here at Botany Bay - the Comr. Says he would not wish for a better place to Settle at than at Port Jackson both healthy and a pleasent Spot - I wish that we may find it So - (Ralph Clarke, 2nd Lieutenant Royal Marines on board the Friendship)

Published by ozgenie1105 points  on Sat 22 of Jan., 2011

The Commadore returned at PM. Made the signal for all Masters & and gave orders to sail for Port Jackson tomorrow morning, as he approved of it better than Botany Bay. The natives here are very affable & and will except of aney thing that you will give them. (and even take aney thing that the can lay hold of) - (James Scott, Sergeant of Marines on board the Prince of Wales)

Lieut Long come on board with orders from Majr. Ross to countermand the orders of my going on Shore this morning According to the orders of Yesterday - a very hott day - Mr. F went on Shore with Lieut King of the Sirius to Show him the place wher Capt M and him Yesterday - Capt. M. went out of the Ship Early this morning and dined out - orders came on board for to hold the men beloning to Capts. Campbells and Tenchs companies to hold themselfs in readyness to Land to Morrow Morning Early - the Commondor went out Yesterday to Brocking Bay about 6 Leagues to the northward to See if there is a better place for use to Settle and more water than there is here - he is not Yet Returnd I Believe he will tonight - the Doctor went on board the Scarborought and Alexr. and I am left here by my self to think the more over your Virtueus my dear Betsey may the great God Bless you. - (Ralph Clarke, 2nd Lieutenant Royal Marines on board the Friendship)


On the 22nd January Governor Phillip, taking with him Captain Hunter, set upon his expedition to Port Jackson, and early in the afternoon arrived at Port Jackson. which is distant about three leagues. Here all regret arising from the former disappointments was at once obliterated; and Governor Phillip had the satisfaction to find one of the finest harbours in the world, in which a thousand sail of the line might ride in perfect security.
The different coves of this harbour were examined with all possible expedition, and the preference was given to one which had the finest spring of water, and in which ships can anchor so close to the shore, that at a very small expense quays may be constructed where the largest vessels may unload. The cove is about half a mile in length, and a quarter of a mile across at the entrance. In honour of Lord Sydney, the Governor distinguished it by the name of Sydney Cove.
On arrival of the boats at Port Jackson, a second party of the natives made its appearance near the place of landing. These also were armed with lances, and at first were very vociferous; but the same gentle means used towards the others easily persuaded them to discard their suspicions, and to accept whatsoever was offered. (from The Voyage of Governor Phillip to Botany Bay)

Published by ozgenie1105 points  on Sat 22 of Jan., 2011

Munday 21 a very fine day - Capt M and Mr. F went fishing at day light and Staid all day - Lieut J Johnstone came on board with order for me to goe on Shore with a Party of Men consisting of ten and Sergt. and brought with him four tents which I am to pitch by day light and to See the orders put in force for which See the orderly Book - caught but very little fish - it is remarkably hott what must it be on Shore if it is So here - (Ralph Clarke, 2nd Lieutenant Royal Marines on board the Friendship)

Published by ozgenie1105 points  on Sat 22 of Jan., 2011

At night. At 4 in the morning made sale. Entered Botany Bay at 8 O'clock am found commadore & the three sale that parted us at sea here. Got an account of Peter Tolburt Corporal of Marines diying Monday the 19th of Nov 1787. Serjt Knight who was suspended at the Cape of Good Hope, was ordered to his former duty on Friday 18 January 1788. - The commadore went to Port Jackson this day (James Scott, Sergeant of Marines on board the Prince of Wales)

On the morning of the 20th, by ten 0'clock, the whole of the fleet had cast anchor in Botany Bay, where, to our mutual satisfaction, we found the Governor, and the first division of transports. On inquiry, we heard that the Supply had arrived on the 18th, and the transports only the preceeding day. (Captain Watkin Tench on board the Charlotte)


20th January. At four in the morning the Sirius and convoy made sail, and at eight o’clock anchored in eight fathom water; Cape Banks E.S.E., Point Solander S.S.E., and the entrance of the bay, between these two lands, W.S.W. We found here the Supply tender, which had arrived the 18th, and the Alexander, Scarborough, and Friendship transports, who had only arrived the day before. To see all the ships safe in their destined port, without ever having, by any accident, been one hour separated, and all the people in as good health as could be expected or hoped for, after so long a voyage, was a sight truly pleasing, and at which every heart must rejoice. As we sailed into the bay, some of the natives were on the shore, looking with seeming attention at such large moving bodies coming amongst them. In the evening the boats were permitted to land on the north side, in order to get water and grass for the little stock we had remaining. An officer’s guard was placed there to prevent the seamen from straggling, or having any improper intercourse with the natives.
Captain Hunter, after anchoring, waited on the governor, on board the Supply, who, with several other officers, landed. As they rowed along the shore, some of the natives followed the boat; but on her putting in for the shore they ran into the woods. Some of the gentlemen, however, before they returned on board, obtained an interview with them, during which they showed some distrust, but, upon the whole, were civilly inclined. The boats sent to haul the seine returned, having had tolerable success. The fish they caught were bream, mullet, large rays, besides many other smaller species. - (Surgeon John White on board 'Charlotte')

Sunday 20 Kist Your dear Imaged as Usual on this day and read the Prayers as usual on dito - Sent a Copl. and four men on shore on duty and Capt. M and the doctor return long after I was in bed and Capt. M a little gone - he informed me that it was Majr. Ross orders that ane officer Should constanty be on deck Day and night which will be hard duty for Faddy and me but Since it is So I will doe it with the greater Pleasure - at 9 oClock the Supply made the Signal for the fleet - Soon after Saw them in the offing coming in which they did - Soon after all the Ships which beloning to the fleet which we parted compy. - thank God they are all come Save - haild the P. of Wales and Charlott and ask the Lads on board how they did answerd all well - I also haild the Lady Penryn and found them on board there well - a very fine day - it is not resolved on what Side we Shall Settle Yet - I wish they were a little quick about it - Robt. Sidaway was put out of Irons this day - (Ralph Clarke, 2nd Lieutenant Royal Marines on board the Friendship)

The Sirius cast anchor in Botany Bay on the 20th, being the last of the ships to arrive.

The openness of this bay, and the dampness of the soil, by which the people would probably be rendered unhealthy, had already determined the Governor to seek another situation. He resolved, therefore, to examine Port Jackson, a bay mentioned by Captain cook as immediately to the north of this. There he hoped to find, not only a better harbour, but a fitter place for the establishment of his new government. But that no time might be lost, in case of a disappointment in these particulars, the ground near Point Sutherland was ordered immediately to be cleared, and preparations to be made for landing, under direction of the lieutenant Governor. - (from The Voyage of Governor Phillip to Botany Bay)

Published by ozgenie1105 points  on Sat 22 of Jan., 2011

On the 19th of January 1788, the Alexander, Scarborough and Friendship cast anchor in Botany Bay.

19th January. In the evening we saw the land over Red Point, bearing W. by N. the extremes of the land from S.S.W. to N. We were then about three leagues from the shore, and, finding it unlikely to get in that night, Captain Hunter made the signal for the convoy to come within hail, when he acquainted them that the entrance into Botany Bay bore N.N.W.: adding that for the night he intended to stand off and on, and early in the morning make sail for the bay.
(Surgeon John White on board 'Charlotte')

At 3 O'clock am made sale, At 5 O'clock in the morning I went to the Mast Head & made the land cal,d Red Point. We made the signal to the Commadore which was answered by A Duch Jack, about three quarters of an hour after the Commadore hoist his Coulers. No Observation this day. fair Weather but could not see the Sun at 12. Steered allong shore distant 3 or 4 leagues, the land looks exceeding well, very level from Red Point to Point Solander, but runs lower towrds the latter, very low to the southwards of Point Solander. Lay too off the opening of the Bay. (James Scott, Sergeant of Marines on board the Prince of Wales)

Saterday 19 Got up very Early to See the Land which was very near use - thank God that there was a fine Breeze - 9 oClock Saw the Supply Brigg in Botany Bay at Anchor - Saw at 10 oClock a great maney of Natives of Point Solander as it is cald to which we went very near which is the South Point as we goe in to the Bay - Saw also a great manny on the North Shore - at ½ past ten came to ane Anchor and found riding neer the Supply Who only had got in Yesterday at 2 oClock - the Supplys Boat came on board with Some hay for the Sheep which I am very Glad of for the
Poor Sheep that had her Lambs taking from her died in the night - the Supply Boat has been on Shore often had intercourse with the Natives who they Say are very friendly but I will not trust them - thanks to my good and Gracious God for his kindness to your Ralph in preserving me in health and welfare and from the dangers of the Sea and has brought me Save to the place of our destination - oh my Beloved Betsey return thanks and Prayers to him for his kindness to me and I hope that he will be - friend me still - I cannot Say from the appearence of the Shore that I will like it the only thing I ask is that it may be a healthy place - Capt M went on board the Scarborough where he Staid all day - Lieut J Johnstone came on board to See me and Staid to Tea - caught a great manny fish - (Ralph Clarke, 2nd Lieutenant Royal Marines on board the Friendship)


Published by ozgenie1105 points  on Sat 22 of Jan., 2011

The HMS Supply arrives at Botany Bay

Latitude 35 degrees 43 minutes S. Wind fair & fine weather at 8 pm the fleet lay too by Signel (James Scott, Sergeant of Marines on board the Prince of Wales)

Friday 18 dreamt by beloved Alicia that I was walking with You and that you was in Your Riding habit then Mrs. and Mr. Kempster was with use but I Soon after lost You and So I did them - oh my dr. woman when Shall I be able to here from You - oh my Tender Betsey what would Your fond Ralph give for a letter from You my dear Beloved wife I must not think too much about it otherwise I Shall be besides myself - fine Breeze and that as fair as it can blow and the day not So very hott as it was Yesterday and the day before - Latt in 35–34 - The Scarborough haild use and askd use how we all did told them as Usual all well - at Six oClock P.M. the man at the Mast head cald out for Seing the land on the L.Bow - made the Signal to the other Ships which they Answerd - Saw the land Soon after from the deck but not very plain - one of the Sheep poor thing is So Wek that She could not bring forth her lamb So that they were oblige to take them away by force and they were both dead - I am Surprize that any of the Sheep are alive for they have had nothing for these Several days past but water and flouer - I hope we will get in to morrow as much for my own as there Sakes poor things - 1pm the Agent made our Signal to Speak use - Soon after 2 haild use to know how the land Bore Answerd W:N:W: - Spoke to Balmain and Sharp and found them all well (Ralph Clarke, 2nd Lieutenant Royal Marines on board the Friendship)


At the very first landing of Governor Phillip on the shore of Botany on January 18 1788, an interview with the natives took place. They were all armed, but on seeing the Governor approach with signs of friendship, alone and unarmed, they readily returned his confidence by laying down their weapons. They were perfectly devoid of clothing, yet seemed fond of ornaments, putting the beads and red baize that were given them, on their heads or necks, and appearing pleased to wear them. The presents offered by their new visitors were all readily accepted, nor did any kind of disagreement arise while the ships remained in Botany Bay, This very pleasing effect was produced in no small degree by the personal address, as well as by the great care and attention of the Governor. Nor were the orders which enforced a conduct of humane, more honourable to the persons from whom they originated, than the punctual execution of them was to the officers sent out.: it was evisent their wishes coincided with their duty; and that a sanguinary temper was no longer to disgrace the European settlers in countries newly discovered.
The next care after the landing was the examination of the bay itself, from which it appeared that, though extensive, it did not afford a shelter from the easterly winds: an that, in consequence of its shallowness, ships even of a moderate draught, would always be obliged to anchor with with the entrance of the bay open, where thy must be exposed to a heavy sea, that rolls in whenever it blows hard from the eastward.
Several runs of fresh water were found in different parts of the bay, but there did not appear to be any situation to which there was not some very strong objection. In the northern part of it is a small creek, which runs a considerable way into the country, but has water only for a boat, the sides of it are frequently overflowed, and the lowlands near it are a perfect swamp. The western branch of the bay is continued to a great extent, but the officers sent to examine it could not find there any supply of fresh water, except in very small drains.
Point Sullivan offered the most eligible situation, having a run of good water, though not in very great abundance. But to this part of the harbour the ships could not approach, and the ground near it, even in the higher parts, was in general damp and spongy. Smaller numbers might indeed in several spots have found a comfortable residence, but no place was discovered in the whole circuit of Botany Bay which seemed at all calculated for the reception of so large a settlement. While this examination was carried on, the whole fleet had arrived. The Supply had not so much outsailed the other ships as to give Governor Phillip the advantage he had expected in point of time. (from The Voyage of Governor Phillip to Botany Bay)

Published by ozgenie1105 points  on Sat 22 of Jan., 2011

Latitude 37 degrees 06 seconds S. Wind contineus to the N. till 7 pm then becomes Fair, Very warm & Sultrey at times (James Scott Sergeant of Marines on board the Prince of Wales)

Thursday 17 it thundered an Lighning very much last night and never Saw So havey rain - it began at 6 oClock in the Evening & continued untill 11 the fell calm from blowing almost a hurrican - dreamt that Your Sister Mary and I were at the Prince George in Plymh. but I dont know how She or I come there but She was drest like a Servent Girl - I hope Poor Girl she is as well as I wish her - then She wont be bad of my dear Betsey - it is quit a calm and the Sun is Remarkable hott - I wish to God that a fair wind would come for 12 hours then we would be at Botany - we have been Sett away to the Southward Since the day befor Yesterday 15 miles So that we are that much father from Botany than we was then - Latt in to day 36–33 South - Got a dale box made to hold my Butter flys for you my dear woman - thank God that we have got a fair wind - hope it will remain So Untill the day after to morrow (Ralph Clarke, 2nd Lieutenant Royal Marines on board the Friendship)

Published by ozgenie1105 points  on Sat 22 of Jan., 2011

Wednessday 16 Sleep remarkably bad from the Ships picthing So much - dreamt that Poor Reynolds was dead - I hope that there is nothing going a miss with him Poor fellow - dreamt also that I Saw Mr. Hartwell who also told me that Reynolds was dieng at Sallys at the Coffy house - little wind and that as bad a wind as blows - at 9 the Signal made to Tack Ship and Stand in shore - at 10 the Signal made to Tack Ship again for the wind heads use on this Tackd - at 12 the Signal for Tack Ship again the wind is it Seems to be against use let use Stand on what Tack we will - I wish to God my lovely woman we had got to Botany we dont lay Better upon this Tack than NW and be W: the wind cannot be worse than it is at present - it being cloudy had no observ. to day it is become Quite a Calm - (Ralph Clarke, 2nd Lieutenant Royal Marines on board the Friendship)

Published by ozgenie1105 points  on Sat 22 of Jan., 2011

Latitude 37 degrees 35 minutes S. Fowl wind at North, Very Hasey: - Stands in for the land. Some of the men has told me that they seen a remarkable large flying fish her (James Scott, Sergeant of Marines on board the Prince of Wales)

Tuesday 15 dreamt last Night My Beloved Alicia that I was with You in strange Place and that I long for a Goose but could not get any but You Sent my dr. woman and got me Some Mutton chops - I hope to God that you or our dear Boy are not ill for if you Recollect You often told me that dreaming of Meat or Eating was a Sign of Sickness - I hope to God that it may not be So - a fine day got up early but no land in Sight and have Stood the Same way - 10 oClock the agent made the Signal for Seeing the land - Saw it Soon after from the deck right a head - it appears very high land - 12 oClock close in with the land by the charts it is Cape Dromadary about 138 miles to the Southward from Botany Bay - can See the Trees very plain on the Shore - I wish it was Botany - Latt in 36–18 South - have gone only 23 miles last twenty four hours to the Northward the wind being So much against use it cannot be worse - 1 oClock the Agent made the Signal for the Ships to Tack - Tacked and hove too to Sound and found the depth of Water 30 fathom fine Sandy Bottem with Shells and Small Stones - got my camp Table finished this afternoon for which I am very Glad - gave one of the Marines a Glass of Grog for Eight half pennys to make me Som hingens for my Tea caddy's - two of Seamen Sick being the only that may be cald Sick and they are not very bad thank God we have been Remarkably lucky having been So healthy he has been very good to use - at 6 PM the Agent made the Signal for the Ships to keep near him - a great manney Porpoises a long Side the Ship hope it will be a Sign to that the wind is going to change (Ralph Clarke, 2nd Lieutenant Royal Marines on board the Friendship)

Published by ozgenie1105 points  on Sat 22 of Jan., 2011

Latitude 38 degrees 05 minutes S. Light winds at pm (James Scott Sergeant of Marines on board the Prince of Wales)

Munday 14 dreamt My Beloved Betsey that I was Made a First Lieut and when I told it you, you Cryd on which I took You in my fond arms and gave you a fond kiss Geo Ventor was who inform me that he had Received a letter from Mr. Martine where he informed him that I and two more were made first Lieuts. I wish to God that it was so my Tender woman for Your Sake and that of our dear Boy's dreamt also Something about Capt. O'Dotherty but dont Recollect what it is it has fell Quit Calm Since four oClock this morning - I was in hopes that we would have been able to have Seen the land this Evening but Since the wind has left use we will not drew Yesterday one Gallen and a half of Rum from the Stewart being part of my Allowance which I have Bottled up and will draw the remainder what is due to me to Morrow thank God (10 oClock) there is a little Breeze come hope it will help use along although it is not So fair as it was Yesterday afternoon it is very warm to day Latt in to day 36–41 South So that we have only 161 miles of Latt to goe to Botany and a few of Longd. this Breeze which we have got from the Eastward would Just carry use in to the Bay or harbour being a fair wind in the Physick which I took Yesterday has done me a great dele of good I wish that I had a pice of a goose I would much reather Sitt down to it than the dinner which I am going to partake of today Pease Soup and Pork and Rice puddon I am Quite tired of them all a great number of fish Seen about the Ship amonst the number a very Ugly one which the Sailors call devil fish - (Ralph Clarke, 2nd Lieutenant Royal Marines on board the Friendship)

Published by ozgenie1105 points  on Sat 22 of Jan., 2011

Latitude 39 degrees 50 minutes S. Feesh breeze at. West, frequent squalls, thick and hasey (James Scott Sergeant of Marines on board the Prince of Wales)

Sunday 13 For these Several day past have been all over Small pimples which Ich very much have taking a dose of Physick to day for it hope that will doe me good there have been but little wind these last 24 hours this being Sunday Kist Your dear Pictour as Usual on this day Read the Prayers lesson and Spalms for the day I wish that a fair wind would come for I long much to get ashore my beloved Betsey to have Some fish or anything fresh for I cannot eat the Salt Beef and Pork I am Quite Sick of them a good wind would carry use there in twodays it not being above 260 miles from use now Latt in to day 38.22 South our consorts in Compy (Ralph Clarke, 2nd Lieutenant Royal Marines on board the Friendship)

Published by ozgenie1105 points  on Sat 22 of Jan., 2011

Saterday 12 It blow in the Night Remarkable hard - Split to pices our main Stay Sail - dreamt that Majr. Foster was dead and that Mrs. F was going to be married to Capt. Cumings - that God the wind is much more favourable and it dont blow to So hard nor So great a Sea - could hardly Sleep for the Ships rolling for she did roll most Tremendously - it is Quite a fine day got up our TG Yards which we were oblige to get down Yesterday the Scarborough haild use and askd use how we all did and found them the Same as we very well hope to be at Botany bay by Tuesday next if the wind Stands Latt in to day 39–14 South. (Ralph Clarke, 2nd Lieutenant Royal Marines on board the Friendship)

12 January - Latitude 41 degrees 18 minutes S. Wind and weather fine. (James Scott Sergeant of Marines on board the Prince of Wales)

Published by ozgenie1105 points  on Tue 11 of Jan., 2011

Friday 11 in the middle watch it was Quite calm and Soon after it came to blow very hard as it dose at this present - oh my dear woman if you was on board how Sea Sick you would be but I wish to God that You was I should be much happier than I am at present for then I should be able to have You in my arms and attend You if You was Sick wher I am oblige to be content with huggin your dear Pictour to my fond Bosom - oh my God when shall I here from You how long will it before - oh I pray constantly for them to goe that I might again pres You to this fond Breast of mine your tender husbands - God out of his goodness bless and preserve You and that of our dear Son - 12 oClock it Still blows very hard - Latt in 42–07 South - a great manny Albertrosses flying about. (Ralph Clarke, 2nd Lieutenant Royal Marines on board the Friendship) Editors Note: The Friendship was in the lead contingent of ships

Latitude 42 degrees 23 minutes South. Stands to the North. (James Scott Sergeant of Marines on board the Prince of Wales) Editors Note: The Prince of Wales was in the second, or following, contingent of ships.

Our progress along the coast to the northward is very slow. (David Collins, Captain of Marines on board HMS Sirius) Editors Note: The HMS Sirius was leading the second (or following) contingent of ships

11th and 12th - The wind variable, inclining to the Southward and Westward, and still an unpleasant cross troublesome sea. We saw a whale, several seals, and many large oceanous birds, which we frequently fired at, without their betraying the smallest symptom of fear at either the report, or at the balls which often dropped close to them. A conclusion may be drawn from hence, that they hd never been harassed with fire-arms before; if they had they would undoubtedly have shown some fear, a sensation they seem to have been totally unacquainted with. In all our firings we did not kill one of them. (Surgeon John White on board the Charlotte in the second contingent of ships)

Published by ozgenie1105 points  on Mon 10 of Jan., 2011

Thursday 10 dreamt that I was with Kempster Smugellin - it blows very hard - another of the Sheep died this morning She was big with Lamb and Several more are lickly to goe the Same way - Saw Several Seals about the Ship - Latt in 42–09 South - less wind than there was in the morning - 4 oClock Quite Moderat - caught what they call in England a Horse Sting Some a Kingsfisher fly - it must have been blown of from the land - this is a hard harted wind I wish that it would change and come fair (Ralph Clarke, 2nd Lieutenant Royal Marines on board the Friendship) Editors Note: The Friendship was in the lead contingent of ships

At two o'clock in the afternoon a very heavy and sudden squall took the Sirius and laid her considerably down on her starboard side; it blew very fresh, and was felt more or less by all the transports, some of which suffered in their sails. (David Collins, Captain of Marines on board HMS Sirius) Editors Note: The HMS Sirius was leading the second (or following) contingent of ships.

Latitude 43 degrees 34 minutes S. Standing to the norred, was overtaken by a very heavy squall, which carried away our main yard in the slings, split our main topsail, main sail and main topmas steakle. This happened about 2 P.M.. The Charlotte which was the next ship to us split her mainsail and main topsail. The rest of the ships did not recave much dammage. (James Scott Sergeant of Marines on board the Prince of Wales) Editors Note: The Prince of Wales was in the second, or following, contingent of ships

Published by ozgenie1105 points  on Mon 10 of Jan., 2011

Wednessday 9 it blow in the night and dose still very hard - Split our FTM Stay Sail in the night and carry away our peak haillaird this forenoon - our consorts in Sight - the wind as foull as it can blow - I wish that it would come fair - Latte 43–17 South - lost 11 miles Since Yesterday - 2 oClock PM almost Quite calm I hope that we are going to have a fair wind my dear Betsey my Beautiful fair one - ½ past 3 thank God the wind is come Quite fair - I hope it will remain So it has been a Terrible night and day for the poor Sheep and Young Lambs I wish they were all at Botany (Ralph Clarke, 2nd Lieutenant Royal Marines on board the Friendship) Editors Note: The Friendship was in the lead contingent of ships

Stood to the North. Close Halled (James Scott Sergeant of Marines on board the Prince of Wales) Editors Note: The Prince of Wales was in the second, or following, contingent of ships

In the night of the 9th the Golden Grove shipped a sea, which stove in all her cabin windows; it was nearly calm at the time, with a confused heavy swell. (David Collins, Captain of Marines on board HMS Sirius) Editors Note: The HMS Sirius was leading the second (or following) contingent of ships.

Published by ozgenie1105 points  on Sun 09 of Jan., 2011

Tuesday 8th. dreamt again my beloved Alicia that I Saw You big with child my dr. woman I wish that I was at home we would See what we could doe and get a little Alicia to be the image of your self - I also dreamt Some thing about Kempster but I doe not Recollect what it was - this is a foggy day and the wind Quite against use - ½ past 8 the agent made the Scarborough Signal to Speak him - at 10 the Scarborough haild use and told use to keep near the Agent as it is foggy wether and that if the wether continued So that when he made the Signal to Tack if he could not See use or the other Ship he would fire 2 Guns which was to be Answerd by one from use and the Scarborough - Majr. Ross askd Capt. M if the Marine Cloothing was done and to get the Mens Arms and Accoutrement ready for landing - drew a Quart of Rum to give the Tayler and the man that cut my hair a Glass of Grog each - Latt in 43–06 South - at 5 PM the Alexr. made the Signal for the land - Saw the land a few Minuets after very plain - the Scarborough haild use again and told use that Majr. Ross desired use to give the Sheep anything that they would eat as the hay was all out and the corn did not agree with them and desired use to hail the Alexr. and See if they had any hay which we Soon after did but they have got non - the Land is St. Marias Island distance 4 or 5 Leagues and the land to Leeward of use is Cald Tasmans head distance between 6 or 7 Leagues - at ½ past Six the Agent made the Signal for the Ships to Tack - answerd it and Soon after Tacked - Saw a great manny Seals about the Ship - Saw also the Trees on the Shore after the fogs clearing away - it looks if it would blow hard to night (Ralph Clarke, 2nd Lieutenant Royal Marines on board the Friendship) Editors Note: The Friendship was in the lead contingent of ships

The fair wind which had accompanied us to New Holland suddenly left us, shifting around to North-East and by east; we were obliged to lay our heads off-shore, in order to weather Swilly and the Eddystone, and the next day (8 January) we had the mortification of a foul wind, a thing to which we had long been unaccustomed.. We now anxiously wished for a termination of the voyage, particularly as the hay provided for the horses was on the point of eing wholly suspended. (David Collins, Captain of Marines on board HMS Sirius) Editors Note: The HMS Sirius was leading the second (or following) contingent of ships.

Stood to the east, light winds. (James Scott Sergeant of Marines on board the Prince of Wales) Editors Note: The Prince of Wales was in the second, or following, contingent of ships

In the night the westerly wind, which had so long befriended us, died away, and was succeeded by one from the North-east. When day appeared we had lost sight of the land (they did not regain it until the 19th when this narrative continues). (Captain Watkin Tench on board the Charlotte) Editors Note: The Charlotte was in the second contingent of ships

REFERENCES - Used for this blog are the Journal of Ralph Clarke, An Account of the colony of New South Wales by David Collins, Remarks on a passage to Botany Bay by James Scott, Sydney's First Four Years by Captain Watkin Tench. Some timeline remarks also drawn from Sydney before Macquarie; A difficult infant edited by Graeme Aplin

Published by ozgenie1105 points  on Sat 08 of Jan., 2011

Munday 7th. very little wind and much warmer than we have had it Since we left the Cape - the land not in Sight - Served the Mens Necessaries - made a twelf [night] cake and it is very good but not So good as if You hadmade it Alicia - I wish that it was of your making - Latt in 43–46 South - had two pair of Breechess made of the pice of Nankeen which I bought at the cape and was obliged to cut up one of my Shirts for Pockits and linning - I could not wear it any longer it been So torn and gone Bad. (Ralph Clarke, 2nd Lieutenant Royal Marines on board the Friendship) Editors Note: The Friendship was in the lead contingent of ships

The long wished for shore of Van Diemens Land gratified our sight. We made the land at two o'clock in the afternoon, the very hour we expected to see it from the lunar observations of Captain Hunter, whose accuracy, as an astronomer, and conduct as an officer, had inspired us with equal gratitude and admiration. After so long a confinement, on a service so peculiarly disgusting and troublesome, it cannot be matter of surprise that we were over-joyed at the near prospect of a change of scene. By sunset we had passed between the rocks, which Captain Furneaux named the Mewstone and Swilly. The former bears a very close resemblance to the little island near Plymouth, whence it took its name; its latitude is 43 degrees 48 minutes south, longtitude 146 degrees 25 minutes east of Greenwich. In running along shore, we cast many an anxious eye towards the land, on which so much of our future destiny depended. Our distance, joined to the haziness of the atmosphere, prevented us, however, from being able to discover much. With our best glasses we could see nothing but hills of a moderate height, cloathed with trees, to which some little patches of white sandstone gave the appearance of being covered with snow. Many fires were observed on the hills in the evening. (Captain Watkin Tench, Marine Corps on board the Charlotte) Editors Note: the Charlotte was in the following, or second, contingent of ships

Lady Penareen (Penrhyn) made the signal for land at half past four in the morning, which proved to be nothing but fogg. At 2 P.M. the Prince of Wales made Van Demans (sic) Land or south cape of New Holland - Observed Latitude 43 degrees 59 minutes, Longtitude 145 degrees 30 minutes East - Seen several sails after wee made land, sailed between Swilly Island and the land; a rock which is called the Ediston stands to the easterd of Swilly Island, thier about. 9 leagues distant from the land, There is a great quantity of wood growes on Van Demans Land, Threes very High. (James Scott Sergeant of Marines on board the Prince of Wales) Editors Note: The Prince of Wales was in the second, or following, contingent of ships

By a lunar observation taken at 10 o'clock of the forenoon of Monday 7th, the Fleet was then distant seventeen leagues from the South Cape of New Holland, and at five minutes past two in the afternoon the signal was made for seeing the land. The rocks named the Mewstone and Swilly were soon visible, and the Fleet stood along shore with fair moderate weather and smooth water, the land of New Holland distant from three to five miles. A thick haze hanging over the land, few observations could be made of it...At night we perceived several fires lighted on the coast, at many of which, no doubt, were some of the native inhabitants, to whom it was probable our novel appearance must have afforded matter of curiosity and wonder. (David Collins, Captain of Marines on board HMS Sirius) Editors Note: The HMS Sirius was leading the second (or following) contingent of ships.

Published by ozgenie1105 points  on Fri 07 of Jan., 2011

Sunday 6 could not get to Sleep untill 3 oClock this morning and did nothing all the time but think about You and our dr. Sweet Boy - it blow very hard in the night - it been Sunday Kist Your dr. image as usual on this day and read the Prayers Lesson and Spalms for the day - thank God this is a fine day and Standing in for the Land - the Scarborough made the Signal at 11 oClock for Seing the land - Saw the land Soon after from the deck it appears very hight the Same as the land that we Saw Yesterday but it cannot be the Same as we run a great way to the Southward and Eastward - Latt in to day 44–01 South - this being old Chrismas day I wish you manny happy Returns of the day my dear Woman God preserve you in health and welfare is your Clark constant Prayer - the land bears from use NN:W: about 5 or 6 Leagues - made a most excelent dinner - a 4 PM the Scarborough haild use and asked use how all did - told them very well as we found them - another of the Sheep died this afternoon poor things I am affraid they will all died if we dont get in Soon a 6 the Agent made the Signal to Speak the Scarborough. (Ralph Clarke, 2nd Lieutenant Royal Marines on board the Friendship) Editors Note: The Friendship was in the lead contingent of ships

No observations. Longtitude 142 degrees 6 minutes E. Wind continuous Fair Course E.B.S. (James Scott Sergeant of Marines on board the Prince of Wales) Editors Note: The Prince of Wales was in the second, or following, contingent of ships

Published by ozgenie1105 points  on Wed 05 of Jan., 2011

Saterday 5 Lay Too untill 3 oClock this morning - it blows very hard with Rain 8 oClock not land in Sight - at 11 oClock Capt Walton and I thought that we Saw the land and So it was for Soon after the man at the Mast Head cald out that he Saw the land to windward - made the Signal to the Agent that we Saw the land by hoisting the Ensing which they Answerd - it is very hight land - I am Glad that we have Seen the land - I wish that I was going from as I am going to Stay on it for Some time - it is a great Way to Botany near Eight hunder miles Yet and the wind is a foul as it can blow - the land Bears from use NNE - had no observation - I wish to god that we were got to ane Anchor at Botany Bay as well for my self as for the Poor Sheep on Board - they have hardly hay Sufficient to keep life in them if we Should be oblig to Stay out much longer they must all die and we be obliged to Eat our Provision without cooking it as there will be no firing in the Ship - the wood has been out these 3 weekes past and they Say ther is not a weeks coals in the Ship a poor look out for them that had the fitting the Ships out - what would we have done if we had not had Such fair winds as we have been Blest with Since we left the other Ships we must all have Starved - one of the Lams died in the night - 3 oClock it blous very hard - Stood from the land they brought too under close reeft T Sails - poor things one of the Sheep died this afternoon and Several more will goe the Same way in a few days - kild one of the Young Pigs this afternoon how I shall feast to morrow - Please God I wish that you were here my beloved Betsey to have a pice of it for I know that you are as Remarkably fond of Pig as I am - (Ralph Clarke, 2nd Lieutenant Royal Marines on board the Friendship) Editors Note: The Friendship was in the lead contingent of ships

Latitude 44 degrees Longtitude 139 degrees E. Sence last reckoning by Commodore. (James Scott Sergeant of Marines on board the Prince of Wales) Editors Note: The Prince of Wales was in the second, or following, contingent of ships

At about 10 at night on the 5th, a very beautiful Aurora Australis was observed bearing about South-west of the Fleet; and for some nights a luminous phenomenon had been seen resembling lights floating on the surface of the water. (David Collins, Captain of Marines on board HMS Sirius) Editors Note: The HMS Sirius was leading the second (or following) contingent of ships.

Published by ozgenie1105 points  on Wed 05 of Jan., 2011

Friday 4 dreamt by beloved Alicia again that I was with Mrs. Stuart and that She gave me Some Gold and a Diamond Breast Pine - dreamt also that Your Brother Mattw. was chasing me on a white horse but I got away from him then I was at Kempsters and was handing Mrs. Kempster in a coach drawn by Six Black horses and that She was going a long Journey - I hope that nothing is the Matter with Kempster or his family - a very fine Breeze and as fair as it can blow - went by the log last 24 hours 191 miles not bad going - hope to See the land this Evening - the Mess drew for Some thing that could not be divided there was three prizes and a Blank and I was the most luckily I drawd the Filtrin Stone, the doctor the Mustard Pott and Mr. Faddy a rotten Pumpkin Capt. M the Blank - Capt. M and Mr. F had Some words again - Mr. F is the most Selfish grumbling and bad hearted Man I was ever Mess mates with - I am glad that he is going to leave our Mess when we get to Botany - I wish that we were there I hope it will not be long - it came on to blow fresh - carried away the F T M Studding Sail Boom and rent the sail to pices - at Six PM: could See no land as was Expected - at 7 PM the Agent made the Signal for the Ships to Bring too - I am very glad that he has made that Signal not having had any observations to day we might perhaps run on board of it before we knew that we was near it (Ralph Clarke, 2nd Lieutenant Royal Marines on board the Friendship) Editors Note: The Friendship was in the lead contingent of ships

At Noon on the 4th preparations were made on board the Sirius for falling in with the land; her cables were bent, signal guns prepared, and every possible precautions taken to ensure the safety of the Fleet (David Collins, Captain of Marines on board HMS Sirius) Editors Note: The HMS Sirius was leading the second (or following) contingent of ships.

At A.M. Hasey Observed Latitude 43 degrees 53 minutes South, Longtitude 140 degrees 36 minutes East, Wind fair, Course E.S.E.. A great number of Arbetross to be seen as we come in with the Land, to the southward. At P.M. this day the signal for Longtitude was made by the Sirius which proved to be 135 degrees 30 minutes East. (James Scott Sergeant of Marines on board the Prince of Wales) Editors Note: The Prince of Wales was in the second, or following, contingent of ships

Published by ozgenie1105 points  on Mon 03 of Jan., 2011

Thursday the 3 dreamt that I was with my Mother and also with Poor Mrs. Stuart good woman - I hope She is in heaven - a very fine Breeze - went by the log last 24 hours 156 miles - Latt in 43–54 South - had a very good Lunar observation and they find them Selfs in 141–odd East Longe. So if the Breeze continues we will See the land to Morrow - Scully Island as Capt. Furneaux cald it after his Brother Place now Parson Furneaux near the mile house - [bound?] the cables to the Anchors - our two Consorts in Company - I was affraid that Capt M and Mr. F would have Quarled to day - I never came across such a Selfish fellow in all my life as he is - I hope that he will not give me cause to Quarle with him for the Short time that we are to be together (Ralph Clarke, 2nd Lieutenant Royal Marines on board the Friendship) Editors Note: The Friendship was in the lead contingent of ships

No observation this day. Longtitude 138 East. Weather continueus Hasey with a fresh brees, Very Cold, Sence wee left the Cape of Good Hope, it being more so, Sence wee came on the coast of New Holland (James Scott Sergeant of Marines on board the Prince of Wales) Editors Note: The Prince of Wales was in the second, or following, contingent of ships.

The evening of the 3rd proved fine and moderate, and the sun setting clear gave a good observation of the amplitude, when the variation was found to be 1 degree East. at noon the Fleet was in the latitude of 44 degrees south, and longtitude by lunar observation 135 degrees and 32 minutes east, of which the convoy was informed. (David Collins, Captain of Marines on board HMS Sirius) Editors Note: The HMS Sirius was leading the second (or following) contingent of ships.

Published by ozgenie1105 points  on Mon 03 of Jan., 2011

Fair winds and pleasant weather (Captain Watkin Tench on board the Charlotte)

Wednesday the 2 Sleep remarkable well I had clean Sheets put on last night - the wind came aft again in the night there is now very little of it - our two consorts in company - at 11 oClock the Alexander made our Signal to Speak him - he hailed use and informed us that he would his boat on board for a cask of oatmeal which they Soon after did - I ask the people in the Boat how all the Gentlemen did on board - they told me very well - also asked them if they had Buried any body Since they left the cape - they answered two convicts but that they were now very healthy only one marine Sick on board - hailed the Alexander and informed them that our oatmeal was very Sower answered use to Send them the best that we had - fine mild day - hope to See the land of New Holland by Friday or Saturday next - was obliged to Send the boat away without the Oatmeal found that there was none in the Ship - hailed the Alexander to Know of the Commissary what we was to have in the room of the Oatmeal answered Pease - hailed the Scarborough and asked them how they all did found them the Same as on board here very well (Ralph Clarke, 2nd Lieutenant Royal Marines on board the Friendship)

Latitude 43degrees 30 minutes S. Longtitude 135degrees 20 minutes E. Weather more moderate, Wind continued fair. - Course for this day E.S.E. At A.M., Set close reef tops!, Fleet in company. (James Scott Sergeant of Marines on board the Prince of Wales)

NOTE: By this time, the Fleet of 11 ships had been split into two. On 25 November 1787 Captain Arthur Phillip had decided to divide the Fleet into two. He transferred from the Sirius to the Supply, together with Lieutenants King and Dawes, and taking the transports Alexander, Scarborough and Friendship, left the rest of the fleet to make its own way under the command of Hunter in the Sirius.

Published by ozgenie1105 points  on Sat 01 of Jan., 2011

The New Year opened with a gale of wind from the northward. which continued with much violence all the day, moderating towards evening. (David Collins, Captain of Marines on board HMS Sirius)

A very strong gale continued at N.N.W. Course E. this morning, Wee could see only one of the Fleet;- at P.M. the Fleet joined company, No observations this day (James Scott, Sergeant of Marines on board Prince of Wales)

It blows very hard and the wind has headed use very much - went by the log last 24 hours 168 miles - Latt in 44�00 South - it is now 1 oClock and I am going to sit down to the Poorest dinner that ever I Sat down too on a New Years day a pice of hard Salt Beef and a few musty Pancakes ... gave to the men one Quart one pint and a half Pint of Rum it being New Years day... (Ralph Clarke, 2nd Lieutenant Royal Marines on board the the Friendship)



This information has been prepared from multiple sources including the AJCP microfilms of Convict Indents, Ship's logs, Surgeons Reports, Journals and New South Wales Early Church Records. Specific documents used in compiling this Blog include the Journal of Ralph Clarke, An Account of the colony of New South Wales by David Collins, Remarks on a passage to Botany Bay by James Scott, Sydney's First Four Years by Captain Watkin Tench. Some timeline remarks also drawn from Sydney before Macquarie; A difficult infant edited by Graeme AplinAs with any work of this nature errors of omission or commission may be present. Information contained on this site is believed to be accurate at the time of publication. Whilst every care has been taken to ensure the information is accurate, it is recommended that you confirm the information on these pages by checking it against primary source material. We cannot be held liable for any error or omission in this publication or for damages arising from its supply, performance or use and make no warranty of any kind, either expressed or implied in relation to this publication.
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