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Borrowdale 1788 locked

The First Fleet Stores Ships – The Borrowdale

The Borrowdale was one of the three Store Ships that accompanied the First Fleet to New South Wales. The ship had been built at Sunderland in 1785 and had a burthen of 272 tons. She left Sydney Cove on 14 July 1788 to return to England via Cape Horn. The crew of the Borrowdale were so badly afflicted by scurvy that the master of the ship decided the most prudent course was to break the voyage at Rio de Janiero. Her plight was that bad that on 6 November 1788 the Rio Harbour master boarded the ship with men to carry the crew to the anchoring ground, where several of the men were then taken to hospital. Five of the crew died on the homeward voyage. The ship the Prince of Wales was similarly affected with scurvy and also dropped anchor at Rio.

The Borrowdale carried no convicts. The following five people have been identified as arriving on the Borrowdale.

ENTRY NAME STATUS
1333 Brown, Elizabeth (Mrs) Came Free - Marine's Wife
1077 Brown, James Private - Royal Marines 54th (Plymouth) Company
8532 Brown, James Seaman
9037 Reed, Hobson Master of the 'Borrowdale'
1491 William, Richard Seaman

This information has been prepared from multiple sources included the AJCP microfilms of Convict Indents and NSW Early Church Records. As with any work of this nature errors of omission or commission may be present. Information contained on this site is believed to be accurate at the time of publication. Whilst every care has been taken to ensure the information is accurate, it is recommended that you confirm the information on these pages by checking it against primary source material. We cannot be held liable for any error or omission in this publication or for damages arising from its supply, performance or use and make no warranty of any kind, either expressed or implied in relation to this publication.

© 2008 Ozgenie Research



Created by ozgenie1105 points . Last Modification: Thursday 11 of March, 2010 15:16:29 AEDT by ozgenie1105 points .

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